Sorting all my fabrics!

Hi all, today I wanted to show you how I organized and folded my fabric collection. I found it a very relaxing and satisfying task to do, and maybe it will inspire you to sort out your own 😉

During the last two months I lost my sewjo a bit after working really hard on my green velvet holiday dress, which then fit really badly, and also dealing with the aftermath of firework vandalism at my studio building. February also took up all my time working on a quilt. And I was really annoyed with my fabric storage solution.

So I thought, why not dig through my stash, get rid of the stuff I don’t need and maybe get inspired by what I own?

Here is a pic of my old studio which shows how I organized my fabric. I had 8 black bins holding everything, some folded, some not – I mean most not LOL!

Keeping my fabric in these bins meant I forgot what I had or couldn’t find anything I needed. The categories I made, like “stretchy” or “wools” made some bins very empty and others stuffed to the brim. In other words they were less than ideal.

I Always Pick the Thimble has a great idea to store fabric using a cardboard cutout to make all pieces the same size.

I made a 23 by 23 cm mold, as that was slightly smaller than my 30 by 30 shelves. Also, most of my fabrics are 150 cm wide, which means I can roughly fold them in fours (with a bit of give for the thickness of the fabric).

I also cut some hang tags to write information of the fabric.

And then I started folding! It took me a full afternoon to sort and fold everything. Then I sorted all pieces by colour as well as possible. I didn’t know I had so many blue fabrics!

The first row is black – solids and black – prints. The whites and grays were mixed as I only have one white cotton with print.

The second row is reds, brown / yellows and blueish greens. The red tartan was a headache to fold, because no matter how I folded is it was just too fat to fit the shelves! I ended up just rolling it more than folding it and was able to squeeze it in. Same goes for the yellow winter jersey…

The third row is my blues – never knew I was a blue lover until I saw my fabric stash. On the left my solid blues, and the other two were just how they would fit. Finally, the bottom row is my greens and two boxes for scraps and special fabrics, which in my case were fake furs and lace.

On the other side of the cupboard (below my high tea set LOL) are boxes with, from top to bottom, my Etsy fabrics, all lining (didn’t even try to fold those LOL), felt and leahter, and finally cotton quilting fabrics. These bins aren’t cute but they are practical and fit great. The shelves are really undeep so it was hard to find something that actually fit.

Here are the hang tags I made! I used a safety pin to attach it to the fabric. It has the yardage, date of purchase and shop name. I buy 90% of my fabrics online so I was able to backtrace most of these pieces.

Another great thing about buying fabric online is that you can easily look up a fabric’s materials. This one is mostly polyester so I won’t make a sweater out of it but rather a skirt. Information like that is important to me because I exclusively wear my handmade wardrobe so I don’t want to make something I never wear.

After doing allll of those hangtags I got sick of it and decided to keep my fabric stash in my sewing journal instead, with a little corner and all information there. Kind of defeats the purpose of me doing the hang tags at all but oh well, you live you learn!

How do you store your fabric?

Thanks again for reading,

~ Mardie

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